Friday Feed (8/13/2021)

Photo by Marta Branco on Pexels.com

Happy Friday, friends! I’m back with a few tasty treats for your end-of-the-week enjoyment. And hey, not just videos, how ’bout that! Here we go!

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  • Back at the end of June, Rod Dreher talked to a couple of anonymous professionals about working inside a “woke” corporation. Some interesting observations here. (Gotta admit, some of this feels very familiar.)
  • This post, reflecting on one of the stories of 9/11 twenty years later, is a bit of an emotional rollercoaster, but it’s a worthwhile read.

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And now, because I know you love it (I do, too!): The video round-up!

(Minor note: Some of these may have some inappropriate language; I honestly don’t remember. I don’t typically like to share clips with a lot of profanity, so I doubt I would have saved these links if there were a lot here. But I can’t recall for sure, so use your judgment and your headphones, just in case.)

I found out about “blaseball” a few weeks ago, and I’m intrigued and bewildered–in a really good way.

This video blew my mind a bit: how Jon Favreau’s indie gem Chef is really about…Iron Man?

I am become a fan of the channel “Full-Fat Videos.” I think they do great work there, and this video about Doctor Who and the introduction of the Eleventh Doctor is bang-on.

And finally, a clip from France’s version of The Voice.

A bit of explanation: I’ve become a fan of watching clips from all versions of The Voice, including all the international versions. I’m a sucker for it. I really tear up when the friends and family members of the performers start crying when their loved one gets a chair to turn during the audition. Ugh. Kills me. Anyway, this song popped up on a few different playlists, and I was mesmerized. It’s a beautiful track that carries a lot of emotion. In the clip, you see that the bald judge (Pascal Obispo) is moved to tears. As it happens, it’s *his* song, a song that became an unexpected hit in France and one that carries a lot of importance for him. The lyrics of the song talk about the passage of time and ephemeral nature of love, and the name “Lucie” happens to be the name of his beloved grandmother (though, from what I read, the original version of the song had a different name before he was presented with it). Anyway, you don’t need to know all that to get the vibe. This is a beautiful track, and I wanted to share it with you. Enjoy.

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That’s it. Happy weekend, everyone!

Friday Feed (1/29/2021)

Photo by Ir Solyanaya on Pexels.com — It’s not this cold where I am, but it feels this cold in my office at the moment.

Happy Friday, fam! Here are some interesting things I’ve found on the internet in recent weeks, for your weekend enjoyment.

That’s it for this week. See you next week! (How is it already almost February?!?)

Friday Feed (8/23/2019)

silver macbook pro on tabletop
Photo by Andrew Neel on Pexels.com

Happy Friday, friends!

I need to take a quick breather from the #52Stories sprint, so here’s a list of updates and interesting links for your perusal:

  • First, a quick sneak peak for what’s next on #52Stories: Lately, I’ve been reading stories by Phoebe Gilman and Wendell Berry, as well as working on notes for stories by Raymond Chandler, Ray Bradbury, and Flannery O’Connor. I’ve got a big stack of short story collections on my shelf from the library, as well, so we are set and ready to go. I hope you’ve been enjoying these entries–I sure have!
  • In addition to short stories, I’m currently still reading through Dr. Al Mohler’s new book on the Apostles’ Creed (and really enjoying it), and I’m a little ways into Jocko Willink’s Disclipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual. With other obligations ramping up in my life, I’m having to dial back my long-form reading quite a bit for the next month or so.
  • Speaking of Dr. Mohler, his annual list of recommended summer reading is always worth a look. Of course, his definition of “summer reading” may be a bit different than everyone else’s.
  • I found this Washington Post article about the challenges of student journalism at Liberty University quite fascinating. The issues described aren’t just limited to universities with presidents currying presidential favor. Some elements of this sounded a bit like my own minimal experience at a private Baptist university.
  • We’re entering an exciting and challenging season at my church, as we’re contemplating merging with another congregation and reforming as a new body. (We would appreciate your prayers on this issue over the next several months!)  This story about a successful church merger was an encouragement to read at such a time.
  • I forget at the moment who recommended the webcomic Wondermark to me (Amanda? Matthew? One of you lovely people…), but if you’re not reading it, it’s a hoot. This recent entry hits a little close to home, if you’re an expert procrastinator like I am.
  • This admonition from Tim Challies is a good reminder that creative work (especially things like blogging) are best when they’re focused on doing good by the audience.
  • Great writing advice from the king of pithy posts, Seth Godin.
  • And finally, a few videos I dug recently:

Ben Kenobi has PTSD–this one’s heavy:

Childish Gambino covers Chris Gaines (Garth Brooks’ pop start alter-ego):

I love “How It Should Have Ended,” and this is another homerun entry:

That’s all I’ve got. See you next week, gang. Stay outta trouble, okay?

Friday Feed (6/21/2019)

light smartphone macbook mockup
Photo by Caio Resende on Pexels.com

Happy weekend-eve, y’all! Here are some interesting links I’ve found over the last few weeks. Hope you enjoy!

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That’s all I’ve got for today. See you next week! 

 

If you’ve come across any interesting links lately, post them below!

#30ThankYous: Lightning Round Part 2!!!

Let’s go with another lightning round of #30ThankYous posts! Today, I’d like to highlight 4 writers whose work has deeply affected me creatively, emotionally, and/or spiritually. (And please forgive the seemingly-random numbering–I’m trying to keep track of the days I skipped this month!)

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#19 – Ray Bradbury

Ray,

I don’t remember when I first encountered your work–it may have been a short-story that was given as part of a reading assignment for school. But from the first time I read your prose, I was hooked. I loved your imagination and the way you highlighted the enchantment and magic of everyday things, the mystery hiding just behind the ordinary. I think most people know you just as the Fahrenheit 451 or Martian Chronicles guy, but you had so much more to offer. Books like Dandelion Wine and The Illustrated Man captured my imagination even more, and made me want to be a short-story writer. Even now, I love the short-story format, and I find myself drawn back to it every time the writing bug bites. Thank you for sharing your magic with the world and inspiring a generation of writers who came after you.

#20 – John Bunyan

Brother John,

Your testimony is powerful and convicting, and your passion for the truth, no matter the cost, humbles me. But I want to thank you most for The Pilgrim’s Progress. Your little book has had a mammoth impact on me. Every page drips with Scripture, and every scene reveals truths about human nature and the Gospel. The stories of Christian and Christiana have become more and more affecting to me in recent years, and each time I read them, I am gripped again by the power of grace and the faithfulness of God. This is a book I encourage every Christian to read because it reveals a vault of wisdom and a treasure trove of insight with each reading. I praise God for your ministry, your witness, and your words.

#25 – Tim Challies

Tim,

It’s hard to think of another Christian writer or blogger today who has as much influence as you do and uses it so well. Your book reviews have become a trusted resource for me, and your frequent blog posts full of links and recommendations are helpful in directing my attention to edifying and insightful content. Your books, like your blog, are written in a clear and compelling style, full of humble exhortation. I was particularly helped by The Discipline of Spiritual Discernment and have used it more than once to prepare for Sunday School teaching. Even when you had to shift mediums due to your recent physical challenges, you have still kept your focus on serving your readers (and now, viewers) well. Thank you for honoring the Lord by striving for excellence and consistency in your use of the written and spoken word. Your contribution to the Church should not be underestimated.

#26 – Charles Spurgeon

Pastor,

It’s unavoidably trendy for a young (or, I suppose, now middle-aged) Calvinist to be an admirer of yours. Frankly, it’s almost become a cliche. I’m sure the surge of “Spurge” fandom would be embarrassing, if not infuriating, for you. But if you will allow me a moment (and how can you not, since you’re in heaven, enjoying the presence of God, so why would you care?), I want to express my gratitude for your writing.

Your preaching ministry is renowned and rightly so, but your writing has made a huge impact on my spiritual walk. Lectures to My Students and your articles in The Sword and the Trowel have been challenging to me both as a preacher and teacher and as a follower of Jesus. Books like All of Grace have brought me comfort and hope. Your handling of the “Downgrade Controversy” demonstrates a constancy and perseverance few in my day could muster. No doubt, the opposition you faced wore you down all the way to the end of your life, but while your candle burned, brother, you shined brightly, and generations who have come after you have seen your good deeds and praised your Father in Heaven.

Thank you, pastor, for your faithful pen, and for your faithful heart. You have strengthened multitudes with your work.

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Okay, that almost catches me up! Four more “Thank You’s” to go! See y’all tomorrow!