We Need to Talk about Bruno-19.

First of all: I thought this was really funny.

#FreeBruno

Also, Encanto is an amazing animated movie, and I’ll post about it soon.

But I bring this up because something’s been bothering me that I think we need to consider:

Catching Covid-19 carries a lot of unhealthy and unnecessary social stigma, and we need to stop treating it like a point of personal or moral failure.

Even now, two years into the #ForeverPlague, I still hear people talking about getting Covid as if they were admitting to having an STD–always in hushed tones with eyes askance. It’s as if the only way a person can be infected is if they are reckless with their health and careless about everyone else, or if they’re a knuckle-dragging science denier whose backwards lifestyle begs to be punished by such an illness. After all, it’s the “pandemic of the unvaccinated” who deserve a long, dark winter of sadness and death, or somesuch.

Weird how even people who are vaccinated can get the disease. Also people who are super careful. Even people in Antarctic research stations.

The other day, I was about to mention during Sunday School that a friend of the group tested positive so that the folks in attendance could pray for a quick recovery. As I was about to mention “the respiratory virus that must not be named,” a couple on the front row practically jumped out of their chairs to shout me down and say that person was just feeling “under the weather.”

This isn’t the only time I’ve seen this type of reaction: no one wants to admit the reality that we’re all getting Covid.

Yes, that’s right, I said it: It’s almost a certainty that we will all get Covid eventually. Probably multiple times.

So much of the public conversation about Covid seems couched in shame and exclusion language, and that nonsense needs to end.

Here’s the reality about Covid-19, gang:

  • It’s a respiratory virus, so it’s never going to be eradicated. We’ll have to figure out how to live with it, just like we live with influenza.
  • Treatments will continue to be developed and improve. More options will become available for both prevention and treatment.
  • Vaccines don’t protect against ever getting infected. It stinks, but it’s true. However, vaccines *do* seem to make subsequent bouts of the illness easier to manage. We can discuss and dispute over whether or not that’s sufficient justification for getting it versus the possible risks and side effects.
  • We should all be free to make the decision about vaccines without external compulsion of any kind. This should be stupidly self-evident, but there you go.
  • Natural immunity is usually better than artificial immunity. Artificial immunity is probably better than simply living with higher vulnerability due to comorbidities.
  • We can do a lot of things to boost our immune systems and give ourselves the best chance to fight off the #ForeverPlague. Take good-quality supplements for Vitamin C, Vitamin D, and zinc. Get plenty of fresh air and sunshine. Drink water. Sleep sufficiently. Eat good-quality food.
  • If you test positive, talk to your own doctor (and not some whacko on the internet) about what treatments and medications may be appropriate for you personally based on your medical history and current health status. Again, talk to YOUR doctor and make a decision with YOUR doctor’s input.
  • Pay attention to your symptoms and don’t be a doofus and go out in public when you’re clearly sick. It’s not rocket surgery.

To address the end of the video above: yes, people are deciding to go back to work, go back to school, and move on with life. The virus should be taken seriously, but we still have to move on. It’s not the bubonic plague, killing a third of the population in a matter of months or years; with some basic preventative and/or supportive care, 99% of folks who get Covid will be okay in a few weeks. The rest, we can all try to watch out for and help out as we can.

And ultimately, I believe that whether or not you catch the ‘Rona is in God’s hands. Do your best, be wise about it, and trust the sovereignty of the King of the Universe. Our days are in His hands, and we’re not even promised our next breath. So just chill out and be grateful for His myriad blessings.

In conclusion, and by way of review:

  • People who get Covid aren’t somehow being punished for their epidemiological sins.
  • Covid infection is not a symptom of moral failure.
  • Lack of Covid infection is not a sign of personal righteousness.
  • Trust God’s hand and plan, and stop being ridiculous about this.

Let me know what you think about all this in the comments.

The4thDave Drinks Bones Coffee (and You Should, Too)!

How d’ya do, Mr. Bones!

I’ve reached the life stage in which gifts I receive for birthdays and Christmas tend toward power tools, grill equipment, and leather goods. The last few years’ gifts, however, have been predominantly coffee-related. That in and of itself is funny, since I don’t consider myself a coffee connoisseur. I like my 12-cup Mr. Coffee and will occassionally enjoy a French press. (My wife has now converted to Chemex pour-overs and swears she’ll never go back.)

I’ve gotten to try a few different brands of small-batch and specialty coffee, but the company that I come back to over and over is Bones Coffee. They have a nice variety of both flavored and unflavored coffee, with lots of neat seasonal and specialty flavors throughout the year.

Note: This is not a sponsored/affiliate post–BUT if the fine folks at Bones want to toss me an affiliate link or discount code to share with you, I’ll be more than delighted to do so.

Here are some quick capsule reviews of flavors I’ve tried so far, in case you want to check out Bones Coffee for yourself:

Mint Invaders from Chocolate Space — Chocolate and mint is my go-to sweet combination. Every year, I hit up Starbucks on or around November 1st for the official start of “Peppermint Mocha” season (and don’t talk to me about how it’s available at other times in the year, because I don’t acknowledge that). I dig “peppermint bark” flavored coffee creamer and mint chocolate chip ice cream–mint and chocolate are totally my jam. I had high expectations from “Mint Invaders…” when I first tried it and was extremely pleased. While the flavor isn’t as overpowering as if you were adding a heavy creamer or syrup to your coffee, the flavor and aroma are definitely there. I’ve gotten multiple bags of this flavor and it’s become one of my regular Bones selections as a result. Definite recommend.

Holy Cannoli — I don’t know what kind of eldritch flavor alchemy the Bones folks are using, but I’m stunned and delighted to find that this coffee actually reminds me of the flavors of a good cannoli–the subtle sweetness of the filling, the nuttiness of the wafer, and just a touch of chocolate. The reason this flavor works so well is that it doesn’t hit you over the head with the combination. Some flavored coffees so overwhelm you that the taste becomes cloying. “Holy Cannoli” hits that right level of subtlety so that you don’t forget you’re drinking coffee, but you’ve got a nice sensory boost from the other flavors. Plus, and I think this is really a key factor, it helps when the added flavor actually complements the flavor of coffee itself. Having a cannoli with a cup of coffee makes sense as a flavor combination. Other flavors, not so much, as in the case of…

Electric Unicorn — This is billed as a “fruity cereal” flavor–think “bowl of Fruity Pebbles.” I won a sample of this flavor in a Bones giveaway and was curious to try it out. Turns out, this one was a big miss for me personally. During my first two sips, I was intrigued, if a bit confused. However, around Sip #3, I actually started feeling a bit nauseated. It’s not even that it was too sweet (obviously, since I controlled the level of added sugar in my cup); it’s that the flavoring was just so strong, and it seemed to clash with the natural flavor of the coffee so much, that the whole thing just wasn’t appealing after just a few swigs. I’m willing to give unusual flavors a try, but if I have no desire to finish the mug, that’s a really bad sign. I’d say pass on this one, unless you’re REALLY intrigued by the flavor concept, in which case I’d recommend maybe starting with a sample pack first.

Sinn-o-Bunn — Again, here we have a flavor where they nail the concept in a way that almost defies logic. In fact, for this cinnamon-roll-flavored blend, the magic works a little *too* well. I wanted to get a good sense of this one, so I brewed a pot with a ratio of 3:1 Bones to plain decaf, and after the first mug, I could almost go back and cut it a little more. The flavor of not just cinnamon but honest-to-goodness “cinnamon roll with cream cheese icing” is *so* strong that dialing it down by mixing it with some non-flavored coffee may just be the way to go for me. Truth be told, that’s not necessarily a bad thing if you want to see your coffee dollars stretch a bit. You could find a good quality non-flavored roast (perhaps some of Bones’ single-origin coffee) to throw in the mix so that it dials the flavor strength down a bit and extends the enjoyment of the flavored beans to additional brews. Either way, this flavor is a qualified win for me.

[Fall Seasonal Flavor] Frankenbones – One of the cool things about buying coffee from a small-batch roaster like Bones is that there are seasonal flavors that come around periodically. While these flavors aren’t available right now, they will be later in the year, so I wanted to put them on your radar now. Frankenbones is one that I’m going to give another shot. The flavor of this autumn seasonal offering is listed as “chocolate hazelnut” but when I had it, the chocolate came through much more clearly than the hazelnut did. It was still good, but I just didn’t get as much of the distinction there. That said, I’m a mocha fiend, so chocolate coffee ANYTHING is a winner for me. I happened to receive a bag of it over Christmas and will be enjoying it soon, so I’ll pop back in the comments and let you know if it won me over even more!

[Winter Seasonal Flavors] The Winter Holiday Exclusive Flavors: White Chocolate Peppermint Bark, Gingerbread, Egg Nog, Jingle Bones, Oh Fuuudge! — Two years ago, we ordered the sample pack of the “holiday” flavors, along with a few extra full bags of Oh Fuuudge! and Peppermint Bark (see above, re: my love for both chocolate and mint). Those two are obviosuly my favorites of the bunch. Jingle Bones is a nice mix of coconut, vanilla, and caramel, and I liked that quite a bit; it reminded me one of my favorite local coffee brands that mixes coconut flakes in the whole-bean bags. Not all of the flavors worked for me—I didn’t love the gingerbread and eggnog samples. Don’t get me wrong; they get the flavors right and they’re not that bad (sorry, Electric Unicorn). They’re just not what I prefer. All in all, it’s a great selection, and if you’re a fan of any of the “holiday flavors” from Starbucks, you should check out Bones’ offerings when they become available in the late fall.

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If you’re a fan of flavored coffee, I think you should give Bones a try. Like I said at the top, this isn’t a sponsored post. I legitimately like Bones Coffee and drink it often (I’m sipping on some Sinn-a-bun while I’m typing this, as a matter of fact). I’ve reached out to the company to see if they’d be willing to hook me up with a discount code for my readers, and if I get that, I’ll update the post. I also have several more sample packs to try out, so I’ll have another flavor round-up coming out later in the spring with more recommendations.

In the meantime, may your brew be strong and your mug be steaming!

(That may be the lamest way I’ve ever ended a post.)

2021 Reading List

Photo by Emily on Pexels.com

Man, this year’s reading list is sad.

The best laid plans of mice and men and parents of toddlers oft go awry, yeah? This year’s reading round-up is short and shallow–and the list of books I started and could not finish seems almost as long!

Here we go, for better or worse:

January

>>The Words Between Us – Erin Bartels

>>The Practice – Seth Godin

>>Conscience – Andy Naselli and J.D. Crowley

February

>>A Hard Thing on A Beautiful Day – Ted Kluck

>>The Burning: The Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 – Tim Madigan

March

>>One by One – Ruth Ware

>>Pastors and Their Critics – Joel Beeke and Nick Thompson

>>Comfort The Grieving – Paul Tautges

>>Something Wicked This Way Comes – Ray Bradbury

May

>>Fault Lines – Voddie Baucham

July

>>Corporate Worship – Matt Merker

>>How to Eat Your Bible – Nate Pickowicz *skimmed the last few chapters*

>>A World without Email – Cal Newport

August

>>She Did What She Could – Don Karns

>>Wolverine: Old Man Logan (trade paperback) – Millar / Bendis / Lemire / Brisson

September

>>Confessing the Faith – Chad Van Dixhoorn

November

>>The Invisible Man – HG Wells

>>Hawkeye Vol 4: Rio Bravo – Matt Fraction / David Aja

December

>>Invincible (TPB Vols. 1-3) – Kirkman / Walker

>>A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens

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A few comments on the preceding:

This is by far the closest fiction/non-fiction ratio I’ve had in 10-15 years (8 fiction to 12 non-fiction). I wonder if that’s a statement on where my mind’s been at this year. Also interesting to note that most of the fiction was read in the last few months–possibly as a means of escape?

More than half of these books are fewer than 300 pages. Some of ones that were longer took multiple tries to get through. This is also the lowest book total I’ve had, possibly since I started counting and posting to a blog. Again, none of this is surprising considering what all I have had going on, but it’s interesting how I’ve struggled with focus/time when it comes to reading this year.

I’m currently “in-progress” with about 6 books, but most actively with another volume of Invincible and a novel by Kazuo Ishiguro called Klara and the Sun. I just downloaded a library e-copy of Erik Larson’s Devil in a White City, so clearly I want to go light to start 2022.

My mostly-fiction DNF list (books I got at least a chapter or two into before stopping early) included, but was not limited to, the following:

  • Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep – just a bit too seamy/grimy to be enjoyable – I won’t be coming back to it.
  • Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd – definitely will return to it, but never got locked in enough to persevere when other shiny distractions arose
  • Robert Heinlein’s Starship Troopers – another one I may get back to at some point.
  • Gregg Hurwitz’s Orphan X – I definitely will come back to this; it looks like a fun series.
  • Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life – okay, controversial take: it’s just not that good. It’s full of obvious observations but it doesn’t really say anything new or meaningful. Admittedly, after the first chapter, I skimmed a bit, but I just don’t see the appeal. Apologies to those who think he’s the second coming of Socrates.
  • Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca – I didn’t get very far into it, but I definitely want to come back to it when I’m in the right frame of mind.
  • Franz Kafka’s The Trial – Meh. I gave it a shot, but it was a bit too pretentious to be enjoyable or even interesting. I’ll go along with some avant-garde writing, but at some point you have to ask, “Am I actually enjoying this?” If not, boot it. There’s no point in reading Important Novels that don’t actually bring joy or greater human understanding.
  • Ernest Cline’s Ready Player Two – What a disappointment. I adored RP1, and I feel like he spoiled it a bit with this second volume. I got so fed up with the protagonist that I bailed after just a few chapters. From what I gather from others, that may have been a smart move.

My top-five reads from 2021 (in no particular order):

  • The Burning, by Tim Madigan – This is a riveting account of the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921. It seemed only appropriate to read it on the year of its centennial. It was a heart-breaking glimpse into a moment of American history that is still so often passed over without comment.
  • Something Wicked This Way Comes, by Ray Bradbury – I read this in high school, but it was almost a different book to me as a middle-aged man. I would recommend revisiting some of the classic works you read in your youth; it’s quite eye-opening. Anyway, Bradbury has long been one of my favorite storytellers, and this one is a wild ride.
  • Confessing the Faith, by Chad Van Dixhoorn – This was given to me as a birthday present in late 2019 and it just took me a while to get through because it needs to be read slowly. Dr. Van Dixhoorn exposits every point of the Westminster Confession of Faith and provides theological arguments for why each element was written the way it was, and what implications these doctrines have on daily life. This is helpful both as a volume on Christian history and as a book for devotional reading and meditation. Excellent on all counts.
  • A World Without Email, by Cal Newport – This one took me a few tries, because it is dense and heavily-researched, but it argues a somewhat controversial or counter-cultural premise: What if businesses and organizations found other ways to accomplish what we claim to accomplish using email? Further, does the universal, constant reliance on email improve or actually hamper true productivity? This is Newport’s most “out-there” thesis, but I think he makes some really strong points.
  • A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens – Seriously, every time I read this short book, I’m blown away by the depth of emotion and understanding. More than that, I’m again surprised by all of the references to Christian faith and thinking throughout the volume. While Dickens wasn’t observably a professing believer, his cultural context was so immersed in Christian thinking and worldview that it is inescapable in his writing. As a Christian, I am delighted and encouraged by every glancing reference and thoughtful aside.

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Your Turn: What was the best book you read in 2021? What should I add to my TBR list in 2022? Comment below!

Meme Sequitur.

I make memes to amuse my coworkers or friends on Twitter. I save most/all of them. They’re mostly stupid.

For some idiotic reason, I decided to gather some of the ones that still make me laugh, even if they are no longer culturally relevant and probably not funny to anyone but me. Think of it as my New Year’s gift to you, the people. But really to myself.

I was tempted to call this post “Meme Time,” but I worried JackSepticEye fans would get upset. (And if you got that reference, you are entirely too hip for this post.)

So, here are some of my favorites, with brief explanations as needed. If any of these are amusing to you, I’ll consider that a win and a great start to 2022.

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Remember that time two guys were arrested for loitering inside a Starbucks one afternoon? And how angry crowds stormed Sbux locations, resulting in photos of stone-faced baristas wishing they were anywhere else in the world? Yeah, that was a thing.

I call this one, “Cage-Stage Keto.”

Self-explanatory.

“Mmmy depreciousssss…”

One more. I can’t help myself.

I’m so hydrated right now, I can see sound.

Oooooh, political!

Ironically, I made this more than 4 years ago, and it’s still applicable!

Pretty self-explanatory, I feel.

Bless up, Harambe, wherever you are.

A Calvinist meme for the home folks.

Heh. Medium.

I stand by this one.

We need you now more than ever, Rob.

From the set of “The Social Network 2.” Alternate caption: “Insert a meta-joke here.”

“Look, Clark’s just here to help, Bruce. We all are.”

Theology-nerd alert.

Only Darin Day will appreciate this, and I don’t think he even reads my blog.

Man, I need to fire up my SNES Classic sometime this week.

If Drake were a grittier rapper.

And, finally.

…I feel like I should apologize for most of these. But I won’t. Happy New Year, everybody!

An Ode to Skipper Dan.

I recently was reminded of this song by “Weird Al” Yankovic. Take a look.

This song was released in 2009 but I feel like it’s only taken on more meaning as I’ve moved into middle-age. There are definitely things I had hoped to accomplish before now, dreams I held onto in my 20’s and even 30’s that I haven’t really done the work to pursue because my goals changed or I just decided that my energy needed to be spent elsewhere.

But rather than reminisce and bemoan what might have been, I wanted to focus on a different aspect of the song: what Dan does and doesn’t do.

“Dusty, why don’t you just try acting?”

When I was in eighth grade, my class took an end-of-year trip to Universal Studios Florida. Back then (the early-mid 90’s), there were several themed rides that have long since been retired/replaced. The ones I remember most vividly were the Jaws boat ride and the King Kong cable-car/subway (?) ride.

When we got into the boat with our “captain” for the Jaws ride, she delivered her script with gusto, as if this were the first time she’d ever led a crew of people into the dangerous, shark-infested waters. When the great white surfaced, she yelled convincingly, “LOOK OUT, THERE HE IS!” and my little 13-year-old heart sank. At the climax of the ride, she pulled out a comically-large rocket-launcher style weapon and “fired” it at the deadly shark, who exploded in a splash of water and smoke and audio-visual flair. As we pulled safely back into harbor, our captain breathlessly congratulated us on surviving the ordeal, and everyone disembarked with smiles on their faces.

The King Kong ride could not have been a starker contrast. The “tour guide” for our New York adventure had all the gusto and excitement of a customer entering Hour 3 of waiting at the DMV. Her lines were so deadpanned that Aubrey Plaza would have seemed like Carrot Top by comparison. (How’s that for a wild mix of dated pop-culture references?) Even when the big ape seemed to be reaching out to grasp the car we were “riding” in, the tour guide could barely evoke vocal inflection. “Oh no. It looks like Kong is trying to grab us. Everyone hold on.”

Obviously, both rides held no real danger from the animatronic beasts and it was all in good fun, but when the Jaws captain really went for it, it made the suspension of belief that much easier.

Here’s my point: there is power in doing the mundane things well. However, in the song, Skipper Dan has realized that the theme-park job wasn’t the easy stepping stone to a dream career that he apparently expected it to be, and eventually he lets it grind him down so that he becomes resentful rather than trying to do something about it. He loses hope because he thinks that what matters most is what he’s doing rather than how and why he’s doing it.

Cal Newport, in his excellent book So Good They Can’t Ignore You, talks about how the path to career fulfillment isn’t in seeking the perfect job or the dream job. It’s in seeking out a job you can do well and becoming masterful at it, so that you can parlay that career capital into an adjacent line of work that’s closer to your “dream” or that provides you with quality-of-life benefits that you couldn’t achieve otherwise.

This is something I’ve been thinking a lot about over the last few years, wrestling with it in my mind. In those times of career frustration and boredom, it’s often that I’ve lost sight of the power of daily excellence.

More than that, I’ve lost sight of my ultimate goal.

“Do it for her.”

There’s a famous moment in an early episode of The Simpsons, in which Homer (who, you will recall, works at a control panel in a nuclear plant) notices a poster on the office wall that says, “Don’t Forget, You’re Here Forever.” He strategically covers the wall (as well as certain parts of this poster) with a collage of pictures of his daughter Maggie, so that the visible letters now spell out “Do It For Her.”

I recently took the template from this moment in the show, and recreated it with pictures of my wife and daughters. Using Microsoft Paint and a little editing magic, my work computer wallpaper now says “Do It For Them.”

I’ll be honest, y’all: I’m not often super-jazzed about my job. I know that it matters, and I know the good that it accomplishes. There are just days or weeks (or even longer) where it feels like an endless field of thistles and thorns: the constant emptying of an inbox or work queue that gets refilled instantly, or non-stop email threads involving a parade of outside company reps who all inexplicably “just started recently” and don’t understand how my organization operates in regard to theirs. It adds up to a frequent feeling of pointlessness to the proceedings because I can’t see the fruit of my labor. (It’s not nearly as satisfying as mowing the yard, that’s for sure.)

I have to remember on those difficult days that I’m doing work that matters not only so that I can serve our clients, but so I can take care of my family. I have a wife and three little girls that count on me to get it done and provide.

And if that wasn’t motivation enough, there’s a greater reason that’s even easier to lose sight of: I’m working for the Lord.

It’s a reality that I can pay lip-service to but not really take to heart. When I work, I not only work in submission to and with faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, but I work on His behalf, representing Him (whether explicitly or implicitly) to the people I come in contact with, whether it’s the supervisor who knows if I hit or miss my daily deadlines, or the outside contractor rep who gets the sharp edge of my frustrated email exchanges. In all of these things, I work for the Lord. And in all these moments, I have the opportunity to use my work ethic and skill and compassion to honor and bless others, as a gift to them and an offering of thanksgiving to God for the privilege of being able to work (since it’s only by His grace that I have the strength to produce a harvest).

Which brings us back to Skipper Dan, and to you and me. Whether you’re a tour guide on a jungle cruise ride, or a customer service rep for an auto parts company, or a park ranger keeping fire watch, or a keyboard cowboy working from home–whatever you do to earn a paycheck, do it well. Do it with intention and excellence. Become masterful at it. Look for ways to make the experience better for your customers or clients.

Not because it will always pay off with a dream job or a big break, but because people count on you to do your best, and because the One whose opinion matters most is always watching.

Monk Manual End-of-Year Sale: 15% Discount until 12/29/2021 [Affiliate Link]

Hey y’all! Just a quick post to let you know that the good folks at Monk Manual are offering a 15% discount on all Monk Manual purchases (excluding bulk/subscription purchases) today and tomorrow using my special affiliate code “DAVEM.” So go to Monk Manual and type in my code — or to make it much easier, CLICK THIS LINK RIGHT HERE — and get 15% off of your purchases to get your 2022 started right with a new journal.

If you’re not familiar with Monk Manual, please check out my previous review of the product.

Buying a new Monk Manual journal with THIS LINK RIGHT HERE will not only get you a really great tool for a more intentional and thoughtful new year, but it will help me out with a little affiliate cash from the MM gang, and I really appreciate that as well.

Thanks very much. See y’all tomorrow.

–Dave

It’s been a long December…

Photo by Toni Cuenca on Pexels.com

“It’s been a long December and there’s reason to believe / Maybe this year will be better than the last / I can’t remember all the times I tried to tell my myself to hold on to these moments as they pass…”

Adam Duritz, “A Long December”

Hey y’all. Quick December update.

Greetings at the end of December. For the 4thDaveFam, it’s been a doozy, full of very mundane busyness, mild frustration, and minor illness. And runny noses. LOTS and LOTS of runny noses.

Of the five elements of the “Power Five” I had talked about in my last post, the one I was most consistent with was telling my girls that I loved them every day. Even that wasn’t a home run itself, but I feel like I’m building into the rhythm of our family pretty well, which is great.

Everything else? Oof. I’ve been a mess, gang. Not sleeping much, not eating well, drinking an unhealthy amount of coffee, not exercising, not spending much time at all in the Word and in prayer. And on top of that, my immune system has been taking a beating from various colds and flus that my sweet little ones have been bringing home and sharing.

Am I hoping to turn things around this week? Of course. Hope springs eternal.

But (literally) at the moment, I’m wracked with wheezing coughs and I’m running a low-grade fever. So any major changes in my daily life may need a couple of days to get going.

Illness and exhaustion won’t stop me from posting a few items this week, I hope. You may see a post I wrote a month ago about frustrated ambition, or a little 2021 reading retrospective, or even a quick affiliate post on behalf of the good folks at Monk Manual (if you’re wanting to buy a journal, wait like 36 hours or so, I’ll hook you up with a discount!). No promises, but since I’m not working this week, I may be able to pull that much off.

In the meantime, just a note of encouragement:

This year, I really feel like I did a terrible job celebrating Christmas (my tongue-in-cheek twittering about the merits of Die Hard as a Christmas movie aside). I wasn’t feeling the comfort and joy on a spiritual level. I went through the motions. I’m bummed out about that in retrospect.

But you know what? That’s why Jesus came: to rescue the hurried, the harried, the helpless, and the hopeless from a life of striving and utterly failing to live righteously. There is nothing I can do in my own power to live the way I’m supposed to. I’m a sinner by nature and by choice, and there is nothing I can do in my own power to overcome that.

But at Christmastime, we celebrate that Jesus the eternal Son of God graciously condescended to be born in human flesh and live among us. The baby of Bethlehem grew in wisdom and stature and favor with God and man, accomplishing a life of perfect obedience to the will and law of God, in order to earn the righteousness we could never touch. Then, at the perfect time, Jesus died in the place of ruined sinners, paying the penalty for our failures and rebellion, so that all who turn away from their sin and look to Jesus as their Savior may be forgiven and set free from the guilt, the shame, the power, and the penalty of sin. Not only that, but Jesus rose from the dead 3 days later, demonstrating His authority over life and death and that His sacrifice on our behalf is acceptable to God. We who know Him as Lord and Savior have a share in that resurrection and will be raised up with Him on the last day, to life everlasting in Heaven with our God.

If you follow Jesus and, like me, your Christmas season wasn’t the worshipful, meaningful experience you wish it could have been, know that the grace of God extends to your lousy December. And you don’t even have to wait until January 1st to “resolve” to do better, because Jesus has done all the “better” for us. He calls us simply to follow Him in obedience, taking His yoke upon ourselves, for His yoke is easy and His burden is light.

On the other hand, if you only know of Christmas as a baby in a manger and a choir of angels serenading frightened shepherds, there is so much more to the story. And the so-much-more-ness is what matters the most to you and me, right now, in the shadow of another Christmas season come and gone.

Comment below or email me if you want to talk about that further.

Merry Christmas, friends. God bless you in Christ Jesus. Talk to you soon.

Happy December!

[Source: https://clearlakeiowa.com/high-five-clear-lake/ ]

Howdy, folks!

Sorry for the extended, unplanned break there. I wasn’t really thinking I’d take a solid month off from posting, but to be honest, I was just struggling to find things to say. So here’s a bit of the ol’ “This is Where I Am Right Now.”

Personal Updates

November was better than October, on the whole. I mean, no loved ones died, so that’s a positive right there. I didn’t spend quite as many late nights working. I got to take a few days off here and there and spend time with my immediate and extended families. And while I didn’t really engage in any performative public thankfulness online, I will say that I tried to appreciate all the many gifts I receive from God on a daily basis. And I’m feeling better, at least mentally. Still dealing with some physical pain and stuff, but doing well on the whole.

Blog Updates

While I won’t try to do another daily-posting stretch anytime soon, I will be hopefully uploading at least 1-2 posts of substance each week. I’ve got a few sermons in the can that I wanted to upload (the last half of the Jude series from the summer, and another sermon I got to preach last month). I have some ideas for Christmas-y content that I may roll out before too long, as well. The point is, I’m easing back in. Thanks for sticking around.

Health/Goal Updates

I’m easing back into my low-carb/intermittent-fasting regimen. “Easing back” meaning that I’m not 100% LCHF-keto, but this week I’ve started reducing my carb intake considerably, and I’ve tried to stick to at least a 12-hour overnight fast between dinner and morning coffee. Over time, I’ll tweak that and shrink my eating window down a bit more. It’s all about iterating and learning how I function best. I’ll probably post on that again in the near future.

As for other goals, rather than wait for January to resolve anything, I wanted to get started with an idea I came up with that keeps my goal-setting a bit more simplified: the Power Five. These are five goals I’m shooting for every day, in order to build back some habits that have fallen into disrepair. My five daily goals are:

  1. Time with God, in Word and prayer;
  2. Doing something physical for 30 minutes every day that breaks a sweat;
  3. Taking care of my body, not only by doing the basic hygiene stuff like showering and flossing, but by actively working to heal/recover where I’m hurting;
  4. Eating wisely and making good choices about what kind and how much food I consume; and
  5. Looking each of my girls in the eyes every day and telling them how much I love them.

Now you may be clamoring to say, “Dave, those goals are too vague! They’re not SMART goals! They’re not measurable or countable or–”

Let me stop you right there, bub. I recognize that the Power Five doesn’t hit the mark when it comes to what “good goals” should entail. There’s a reason for that.

The only measurable I’m aiming for is consistency.

My hope is that, over the month of December, I can begin building a consistent rhythm that will carry me forward. Once I have that rhythm going, I can start attaching some numbers to the process.

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So there’s my update: life is good and I’m grateful; I plan on posting more often this month; and I’m looking to give myself a Power-Five every single day in December.

See y’all later!

#Blogtober2021 Day Almost the End: “#FridayFeed Videodrome–THE REVENGE!”

Photo by KoolShooters on Pexels.com

How’s that for a title!

Hey gang, I figured it was about time for another #FridayFeed post, and I have a bunch of videos I’ve collected over the last few weeks that you may enjoy, so here’s your bit of weekend entertainment.

Hit me up in the comments and let me know your favorite. Leggo!

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I’m a fan of Doctor Who (at least up until the current incarnation which is…not good). This video explores what may be one of my very favorite episodes of New-Who, featuring what is probably my favorite version of The Doctor from this era of the show). This may not interest you if you’re not familiar with Who, but it does provide a great analysis of how science fiction can be used to examine themes like loss.

I first saw Sam Perry on the Austrailian version of the TV show The Voice. This Beatles cover is stellar.

If there’s any possible way to redeem a Nickelback song, Alex Melton’s the guy to do it.

I loved this video about how lo-fi music works. It totally makes sense why I love it when I’m trying to pull a late-night work session.

Okay, one more Peter Capaldi clip because seriously, this dude just kills it as The Doctor. You don’t need context for this one, but I just love this monologue (one of the very few moments of the show that breaks the fourth wall).

You’ve probably heard the story of how Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater production of War of the Worlds created a nationwide panic. Well, the truth is…probably not that extreme. However, this retrospective of the broadcast and aftermath (from “Inside a Mind”) is fascinating and well worth your time, exploring a possible reason why that panic myth was spread.

And if you’re interested in listening to the WotW broadcast in its entirety, here you go:

Austin McConnell’s video on why escape rooms sometimes don’t work or aren’t done well is interesting (although he doesn’t give much in the way of recommendations for how to make them better). Still, worth a look if you’re into that.

POMPLAMOOSE / MOBY – “Extreme Ways” — SO. GOOD.

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That’s it, gang. Have a great weekend. I’ll have something new for you next week!

#Blogtober2021 Day Whatever: We’re fine, we’re all fine here, now, thanks… How are you?

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Just popping in here to say: I’m doing okay. Lots going on.

  • My grandfather died at the end of last week, bringing the (hopefully) final total to 3 extended family members who passed away this month. All three had serious medical conditions. It’s still sad.
  • Work life is busy, church life is busy; both are stressful, both are blessings.
  • My household’s doing okay. My kids have colds and aren’t sleeping that consistently this week. We’re all feeling a bit exhausted. But down here in the southland, we’re now enjoying a brief cool spell, so that means more time outside this week, which is good for everyone’s disposition.
  • My wife and I are trying to buy our first home and realizing we’re a bit out of our depth with this process. Thankful for a good realtor to hold our hands (and keep our heads above water).
  • Again, I may not post much more this week. But I’m doing okay. Still not getting my sleeping schedule and eating habits (or caffeine consumption) in proper balance. Hope to do that next week, as I take some time off work and spend time with my family. November reset, here we come.

That’s it, that’s what I got. Let me know how I can pray for you in the comments. Talk to you later.